1. Got this and other DVDs in Malawi last week. They are Chichewa (local vernacular) voice-over translated versions of Hollywood movies and the people I saw there loved them. Well, the Kung-Fu one that was showing in a makeshift movie house at least. More on it here: http://www.techzim.co.zw/2013/12/african-pirates-translating-hollywood-movies-into-local-languages/ 

    Got this and other DVDs in Malawi last week. They are Chichewa (local vernacular) voice-over translated versions of Hollywood movies and the people I saw there loved them. Well, the Kung-Fu one that was showing in a makeshift movie house at least. More on it here: http://www.techzim.co.zw/2013/12/african-pirates-translating-hollywood-movies-into-local-languages/ 

     
  2. u can’t pirate a live experience, the emotion, the direct contact with the artist

    We’ve a number times in the past written about music, piracy and how local artists can help themselves survive their-music-everywhere-for-free age. One such article was penned by Brian Gondo about a week ago. But speak as we may about the industry, we’re not musicians. So it was great today reading a comment to Brian’s story by one of the best hip-hop artist there is out there (yes, not just best in Zim) Tendai “Tehn Diamond” Nguni: 

    The music itself is no longer the primary income engine. That’s the global trend. Making mp3’s available and trying to do that in an effort to make money is not the way, the goal should be to beat obscurtiy with wider distribution. I am an artist living and working in Zimbabwe, and I believe that piracy is not the enemy, obscurity is. The music should service as the foundation to bring potential fans into an artist’s conversion funnel, where u look mainly to recoup money off the intangible products an artist can provide. The best example being live shows, u can’t pirate a live experience, the emotion, the direct contact with the artist. What a major player in the industry like Gramma should be doing is looking to be come a company that helps artists develop and strength their brand, with the music as the foundation of that. To develop a wider and more reliable network of live venues and go on a mission to re-educate bothe artists and the fans. Piracy isn’t killing the industry, its a lack of forward thinking innovation.

    And just in case you don’t know who he is, here’s his Facebook Page. You can also watch this video here to get an idea of just how much talent and quality work Tehn’s about.

     
  3. Discovering flattr

    I never used the pirate bay. Not because I didn’t like it or was against their mission but mostly because their content or whatever they did i snot my cup of tea. I don’t usually need to download a movie or song. Google+ YouTube does for songs pretty well for me, and my internet pipe is not big enough to pull in movies conveniently. Just being honest here. 

    Anyway, I was reading about the rejection of the Pirate Bay case by the Swedish Supreme court, and found this article by one of the founders, Peter Sunde, quite interesting.

    Sweden speaks well about caring about the Internets. They spend a lot of money and time on helping activists all around the world. But who are these people that they’re so proud of helping? TPB has been one of the most important movements in Sweden for freedom of speech, working against corruption and censorship. All of the people involved in TPB at some time have been involved in everything from famous leaks projects to aiding people in the arab spring. We’ve fought corruption all over the world. We’ve promoted equal opportunities to poor nations around the globe. We’ve crushed the monopoly on information. Our close ones, many who have helped building TPB, have been mentioned as possible winners of the nobel peace prize. I’m not bragging – I’m saying this to make sure that people understand who’s doing the right thing here. I haven’t seen the entertainment industry help anyone but themselves.

    Today I urge everyone to make sure that the entertainment industry does not profit from them anymore. Stop seeing their movies. Stop listening to their music. Make sure that you find alternative ways to culture. I’ve founded Flattr.com, which allows you to support people that create directly instead of going through the corrupt entertainment industry.

    That’s how I found out about Flattr, and I love it!