1. Avenues #Harare

    Avenues #Harare

     
  2. Why more people in Harare should use Scooters

    a reblog from Techzim.

    scooter

    On 22 February this year, I bought a scooter. I have been using it ever since. Well, not every day initially, but now it’s become my primary means of transport. It’s changed how I move around drastically and not a day passes without me thinking to myself; why the hell did I take so long to do this.

    So I thought I’d share the reasons more some of you reading this might consider to buy a scooter sooner than you would have.

    • First, I think Zimbabwe will make huge savings if we use more scooters and less cars. The price of a brand new scooter is way less than the second hand Japanese cars we love so much. A new scooter on average costs $1,000. A decent low cost second had Japanese import car will cost an average $4,000 to land it in Harare!
    • And it’s not just they the price tag. The important costs to pay attention to, as all once naïve owners of first cars will tell you, are the costs to keep the machine running: fuel, insurance, road license, parking, parts. All those are way lower on the scooter. An example; a very efficient 2,000 Toyota Corolla import does between 13 and 16 km on a litre of petrol. The scooter hits 37km! You don’t pay parking fees because the council just doesn’t mind scooters. Overnight, you can park it inside your house! Or chain it to a tree etc… Parts are cheaper and servicing is so simple you can do it yourself!
    • We need to do something about the traffic madness. I don’t think we have too many cars in Harare; we just have too many inconsiderate drivers and maybe too many of us ‘bought’ our drivers licenses. The traffic lights log jams were driving me crazy and I decided I had had enough of it. I didn’t want to be logged jammed. I didn’t want to be stuck shouting and being shouted at by fellow drivers.
    • Less cop bribing. The traffic cops don’t give a hoot about scooters and you’ll almost always go past a roadblock without being stopped. More scooters on the road will have the cops paying more attention though, but let’s worry about that when it happens.
    • The danger is not as bad as people imagine it. Scooters are not super bikes. The fastest possible on mine is 70km/hr. I average 45km/hr and can come to a halt in just a second in those crazy moments when you drivers somehow can’t see a whole big red object. And those moments can be many. Which brings me to;
    • If we buy more scooters, our roads will become safer for riders in general. We’ll just become more visible; more expected to be sharing the road. Hopefully, the city managers will design the roads with riders in mind.
    • If you use public transport for short distances commuting to work and back home (around 15km for example), you probably spend more a week on bus fare than a scooter rider does on fuel. Especially also considering a scooter rider has the time flexibility and other added convenience.

    On the danger again
    I have fallen off the bike at least twice. The first time I made a U-turn on a wet slippery tarmac (read recklesriding). The second time, a driver just didn’t see me and drove right into my path; I squeezed on the emergency brakes on time but being a newbie, I lost balance. Only the scooter got scratched on both occasions. I came out unscathed and wiser.

    Culture
    Yes, it’s been said many times that Zimbabwe, unlike fellow emerging market countries, doesn’t have a bike culture. Bikes are considered a utility for package delivery workers, NGO field workers, security guards and new farmers. The other extreme is them being just a luxury for super bikers. The middle income urban person somehow doesn’t feel the need to use a bike. Either they are using public transport (which I should say, are also quite dangerous) or they have their own car, sometimes carrying around 3 empty seats everywhere they go.

    I think we should build a scooter culture!

    Not all roses. Sometimes it rains... heavily!

    Not all roses. Sometimes it rains. Heavily!

     
  3. Saw this neat piece of art at the Tourism Expo last week in Harare. Guy was selling his Gonyet for US $5,000. Worth it and more. All hand made with pieces of wire and a pair of pliers. The attention to detail is amazing!

     
  4. couldn’t think of any caption here. took the photo sometime last year (or the previous year). It reminded me a lot of my childhood. Kuenda kumunda. the big sister who’s also just a child. ma patapata.

    couldn’t think of any caption here. took the photo sometime last year (or the previous year). It reminded me a lot of my childhood. Kuenda kumunda. the big sister who’s also just a child. ma patapata.

     
  5. Harare sunset

    Harare sunset

     
  6. The Anthill (Harare, Zimbabwe)

    One of the unique and magnificent designs in Harare. Done by a guy calledMick Pearce

     
  7. walking in the prophetic

    walking in the prophetic

     
  8. Lines & Airtime available here

    Lines & Airtime available here

     
  9. Took this photo on Sunday while passing through the Rainbow Towers hotel in Harare. Went inside the truck and met a Chinese guy (a techie i think) who loved responding “no no no no” to most of what I asked. Thought he didn’t speak English until, when i persisted with the questions, he said they were not having the show on that day and to check with their offices on Monday if I needed info.

    Then, “no no no no! I don’t know you… no no no no!” until I left.

    I hear the MBB show (whatever that is) is going to be held today. Will see if i can attend and learn why Huawei is reaching directly to the consumers now. All this time thought they’d just be doing the background infrastructure work for mobile operators. Or maybe the operator they’re are backing here will conduct the actual show today.

     
  10. NetOne mobile broadband

    NetOne mobile broadband

     
  11. Dropbox saved my data [life]

    Lesson learnt. You don’t leave your valuables unwatched in Harare. Not even for less than a minute. But it’s not a lesson I had to learn again. Coz I have learnt it a dozen times already. I just need to stop being so careless.

    Left my car trunk unlocked on 17 February. I was rushing to the Intellectual Property jumpstart event. This one. I was packing stuff into the trunk and had to rush back into the house to get more stuff (actually to just check if I hadn’t left anything I’d need later).

    I shut it but I didn’t lock it. And I hesitated momentarily before I left the car. Maybe I shouldn’t have hesitated; the damn thief must’ve been watching all the time. He saw me pack the laptop into the car. So when I came back, less than a minute later, it was gone. Gone.

    Wrecked my whole day. Wrecked my whole week in fact. Would have wrecked my life if it wasn’t for Dropbox.

    To encourage people to try Dropbox, I usually tell them it’s the greatest invention on the internet since Gmail. It is true. Please do yourself a favour and get it.

     
  12. paNSSA

    paNSSA

     
  13. Small boy plays a PlayStation game in the new Sony shop in Harare

    Small boy plays a PlayStation game in the new Sony shop in Harare

     
  14. Been seeing too much of this lately. Benzes. Deep ditches in the middle of the city, so old they gathering garbage. Everybody in a hurry. Jeeps. Neglect…

    Been seeing too much of this lately. Benzes. Deep ditches in the middle of the city, so old they gathering garbage. Everybody in a hurry. Jeeps. Neglect…

     
  15. Always a pleasure seeing the 120y on the road.
Corner Julius Nyerere & Robert Mugabe in Harare (Zimbabwe)

    Always a pleasure seeing the 120y on the road.

    Corner Julius Nyerere & Robert Mugabe in Harare (Zimbabwe)