1. No Google no. What’s this nonsense? I felt relatively safe owning a Motorola device. Now this!

     
  2. Techzim, Google+, Hacker News and the old Google

    Sometime last week I posted this article on Techzim about why I don’t use Google+ much, and why I think the reason behind is something that discourages most other internet users in Africa. It’s basically a speed issue. Google+ as a news topic is that interesting an issue we got an avalanche of traffic from all over the world after I posted the article on Hacker News. The story actually made it to the top 5 news items on Hacker News. Techzim obviously couldn’t handle this sudden surge and the whole day we had to put up with “resource limit reached” errors from our hosting.

    For me, this points to one thing, people really wanted Google to succeed with Google+. I know I did. I still do. But more and more, I encounter cases where I see the old Google I loved, may really be gone.

     
  3. The Google I love!

     
  4. 
It’s your everything. The breadth of information Google wants to collect and collate is the stuff of goosebumps.

writes MAT HONAN
All this time I thought that’s what Facebook is about. In a much more scarier way I must add.

    It’s your everything. The breadth of information Google wants to collect and collate is the stuff of goosebumps.

    writes MAT HONAN

    All this time I thought that’s what Facebook is about. In a much more scarier way I must add.

     
  5. The ad assault continues. Wonder how much Domain.com is paying Google to target a user that’s not interested at all in their product. Makes you understand why Facebook is such a threat to Google’s business model.
Update: Thank God I found the Google page with the option to not have ads targered based on what Google thinks you like. Here: https://www.google.com/ads/preferences

    The ad assault continues. Wonder how much Domain.com is paying Google to target a user that’s not interested at all in their product. Makes you understand why Facebook is such a threat to Google’s business model.

    Update: Thank God I found the Google page with the option to not have ads targered based on what Google thinks you like. Here: https://www.google.com/ads/preferences

     
  6. Google, please stop ‘knowing’ what I want

    Yesterday I did a search for “domain registration” on Google. I did the search to find an article we did sometime back on the tedious process of registering a domain in Zimbabwe. To its credit, Google did return some great results, suffocating under the weight of ads albeit.

    But I made a mistake, I clicked on the first result (domain.com) just to check if  it wasn’t search spam. I think it wasn’t, but Google being the smart engine we all love registered I must have an interest in these guys’ services. Now a domain.com advert is following me everywhere I go. I have no interest at all in registering a domain right now. Not even if it’s “original and best”.

    I wish domain.com would just leave me alone. Anyone knows how to tell Google to stop without just logging out?

     
  7. "The Google I left was an advertising company with a single corporate-mandated focus"

    I read “Why I left Google” yesterday and as usual, didn’t enjoy being told my favourite tech company should not be. The guy basically says Google sold its soul for ad dollars.

    I disagreed of course. And to convince myself the guy was just plain wrong I observed that even though the guy was going on and on about how “The Google I left was an advertising company with a single corporate-mandated focus”, he didn’t mention anywhere where the advertising was a problem. Instead, he complained about having issues with Google the company being turned into Google+ the product. By Larry Page.

    So I clicked away a self-assured Google fanboy. The today, I searched for “Domain registration”. Only a quarter of my first screen is dedicated to organic results. The rest is just ads.

     
  8. If like me you’ve been wondering why Nigerian IrokoTV moved from YouTube to create their own movie website (Powered by Amazon Web Services and Ooyala) well here it is. Google didn’t care.

    To make money, he had to put in ads every 15 minutes which greatly interrupted the flow of a full-length movie. He spent months asking YouTube if he could cluster several ads at the beginning the way other channels on YouTube do. They simply didn’t answer or refused to budge, saying those were special arrangements for other partners– even though some of those partners had lower volume.

    If his it the first time you’re hearing about IROKOTV, well, they are one of Africa’s most aggressive internet startup. Nigerian tech blog, Techloy, has covered the startup extensively.

    Here’s are some telling stats:

    • The company has acquired the exclusive rights to distribute all of Nollywood (Nigerian Hollywood) movies online
    • Nigeria’s movie industry is the second biggest in the world by volume of films produced
    • Before Jason Njoku shut down the IROKOTV YouTube channel, the startup was getting over 1.2 million viewers monthly and has generated about $1 million in revenues mainly from adverts on the movies.
    • IROKOTV launched their own website on 1 December 2011 and in that first month registered some 1 million visitors.
    • Finally, here’s an article by the founder, Jason Njoku, posted on Techloy, where he discusses his failures and successes on the internet.
     
  9. Loved this paragraph from the Memeburn article:

    With Google’s “Mocali-gate” one is already seeing the signs that the public image of Google may be shifting from one of “Mr nice guy” to “Mr nice guy that could beat you up”. As Google grows bigger it is starting to no longer present the image of a brand that is personal and human but rather that of being another big corporate monopoly. With Google’s growing empire its challenge is to maintain that image. The magnitude of the task requires more than just changing their homepage logo with a new gimmick every month and as such, if they don’t succeed, 2012 may be the dawning of a new Google?

     
  10. My take on the new “Search plus Your World”

     
  11. First, let me start by saying I should probably be reading less of your stuff simply because of what I’m about to say. 

    Your hatred of Android is lacks relevance outside the US. More specifically, it lacks relevance in Africa.

    I’m in Zimbabwe and to get a smartphone I have two choices:

    The average working person in the country get something like US $250 a month. In Kenya, the Ideos costs even less; around US $90. Granted you can’t compare the two phones on features, but they’re both smartphones. The Ideos has been a hit in Kenya and is almost guaranteed to get the same popularity in Zimbabwe and other Africa countries.

     
  12. You probably read the double-standards issue that Chrome got Google into a couple of days ago. It was covered by search guru Danny Sullivan here. Basically Google was ‘caught’ using spammy link referral methods to promote it’s Chrome browser. The methods in question, as detailed by Sullivan, would get any website banned from Google Search if caught.

    The issue itself looked like a case of a corporate too big to know everything going on the ground. Which is why guys like Sullivan are important. Anyway, my favourite tech writer, MG Siegler, had this to say:

    If true, Google should be banning links to Google Chrome’s download page for a year or so, per their enforcement of previous violations of this nature by third-parties. Will that happen? Probably not. Which is shameful. Instead, the buck will likely be passed and excuses will be made.

    Today, Google’s head of Google’s web spam team Matt Cuts responded to the Sullivan post:

    In response, the webspam team has taken manual action to demote www.google.com/chrome for at least 60 days. After that, someone on the Chrome side can submit a reconsideration request documenting their clean-up just like any other company would. During the 60 days, the PageRank of www.google.com/chrome will also be lowered to reflect the fact that we also won’t trust outgoing links from that page.

    Searching for chrome, or browser on Google right now does not return the Chrome page. This is of course more a PR more than anything else, but still instills some confidence that the quality of results is still something Google doesn’t tolerate compromising.

    Siegler? This was a brilliant opportunity to label Google a hypocrite. I’d be shocked if he didn’t take it.

     
  13. Google multiple sign-in at ‘work’. Thanks Google for fixing this

    Less than a month ago, I had a major gripe with the way Google’s multiple sign-in worked. The gripe was that it didn’t always work predictably.

    Today, while signed into a Google account that’s not Adsense-able, I got the screen below: 

    Thanks Google!